Welcome to Northern Brewer

– "Brew, Share, Enjoy."

cold crashing

Moderator: Global Moderators

<<

RugenBrau

Apprentice Brewer

Posts: 17

Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 7:33 am

Location: Finger Lakes, New York

Post Fri Oct 24, 2008 8:40 pm

cold crashing

Can someone explain cold crashing to me. I,m not familiar with it. Doesn it permantly stop fermentation?
<<

Denny

User avatar

Master Brewer

Posts: 21950

Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 2:09 pm

Location: Eugene OR

Post Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:42 am

No, it will not permanently stop fermentation. The yeast may go dormant, but they'll start up again if it warms up.
Life begins at 60....1.060, that is.

www.dennybrew.com
<<

RugenBrau

Apprentice Brewer

Posts: 17

Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 7:33 am

Location: Finger Lakes, New York

Post Sat Oct 25, 2008 12:29 pm

ok this is starting to clear up some of the confusion. If you cold crash, you have to keep the cider cold.....you can't let it get warm. Now, can you force carb it once you have cold crashed it? Thanks What temp should you use to old crash it?
<<

jeff-prime

Post Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:32 am

I'd love to know the answers to these questions as well. I have a batch of cider that started at 1.048, is now in the secondary at 0.998 and dropping. I don't want apple rocket fuel so I'm trying to figure out how best to stop it from getting drier.
<<

silverfront

User avatar

Master Brewer

Posts: 1391

Joined: Fri Feb 04, 2005 8:22 am

Location: athol, MA

Post Fri Nov 14, 2008 11:56 am

all cold crashing is is chilling it down to a temp below the yeast's active range. as long as you didn't use lager yeast most serving temps (below 50F) are going to be cold enough. check the specs on your yeast, pic a temp, pic a carbonation level and go to town.
<<

CvilleKevin

Brewer

Posts: 72

Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:30 pm

Post Fri Nov 14, 2008 5:02 pm

Cold crashing will permanently stop fermentation if you use a yeast which flocculates at low temps, which is most ale yeasts.

I've made close to 400 gallons in the past 10 years, cold crashed most of it, store at room temp and never had a problem. I do mostly kegs, but I've also done aprox 200 liter bottles. The only time I've ever cracked a bottle was with a wild yeast batch that I made last year and crashed at 1.020. One of the bottles cracked over the summer, sometime in July. I knew I was pushing the envelope with that batch, usually I crash at 1.010 or lower.

What I do when I cold crash is first rack into a fresh carboy. Then chill at 35 degrees for at least 24 hours, preferably 2 or 3 days if I dont have a backlog. Then rack again into another fresh carboy. The key is to leave the yeast on the bottom of the carboy each time you rack, so dont try to get every last drop.

After that, I usually let it settle a few weeks to clear, unless I'm in a rush to drink it. Sometimes there is a little more fermentation and the sg will drop a couple more points over the next few weeks before completely stopping and I've had a couple of keg batches that I've had to crash twice to get to stop. For some reason gallon batches always stop dead in their tracks.

You can cold crash a lager, but its more trouble and probably the racking more than the cold that makes it stop. I have a keg batch made with S23 which I crashed about a month ago at 1.010. It started back up again so I racked it about 10 days later at 1.004 and its been stable since. I did a test gallon batch with S23 last year and the cold crash stopped that batch dead at 1.004. When we drank the last liter in September, there was no carbonation.

One disclaimer - last year is the first year that I've made enough cider to last past the winter, so until last year the liter bottles never got really hot, even though they were stored at room temp. Max temp would have been around 65. Last year I saved 36 liters through the summer, until this past September. These were made will all different types of yeast and juice and crashed between 1.002 and 1.010, except for the batch of wild yeast which cracked. None of the others had any carbonation, even though it got plenty warm (85+) in my basement.
<<

buggawugga

Posts: 2

Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:56 pm

Post Wed Nov 04, 2009 5:08 pm

Re: cold crashing

So if I'm reading this correctly, I can rack my cider when it reaches around 1.010, cold crash it for 2-3 days, rack it again with 1 Tbsp of sugar/gal for bottle carbing, rack into bottles and store at room temp?

Or should I rack it, put it in the fridge for a couple of days, rack again, let it settle, then rack into bottles with no extra sugar and hope that there is enough activity to carbonate it in the bottles at room temp?

I used half a packet of Lalvin EC-1118 champagne yeast in 3/4 gallons of pasteurized juice and am worried it will be super dry, but still want a carbonated final product.

Thanks!
<<

CvilleKevin

Brewer

Posts: 72

Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:30 pm

Post Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:28 pm

Re: cold crashing

No - if you cold crash properly, you will remove the yeast and you cant bottle carb. You'll need to use a keg if you want add carbonation.

champagne yeast is tough to crash - it doesnt floculate as consistently as ale and wheat yeasts
<<

buggawugga

Posts: 2

Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:56 pm

Post Wed Nov 04, 2009 9:57 pm

Re: cold crashing

Hmm... thanks CvilleKevin... I did read through the post of your experiments, but not until after I had already yeasted my brews. I'm definitely on the lookout for some S04 for the next round.

I don't have a keg and I'm still working in small batches at the moment but I'm still looking for a way to salvage this batch... the primary bubbled away for about 2 days and I tested it and it went from 1055 O.G. to 1010! So I just racked it into a clean carboy and was planning on keeping an eye on it to see if it'll keep bubbling. If it's settled down considerably (let's say to about 1 bubble a minute), would I be able to sugar prime and bottle carb then?

Alternatively, I was thinking that if it gets quite active again, I could re-rack it and then see about bottle carbing once it settles down. The thought is that if I remove as much of the yeast as possible early on, then it might not get as dry and I can still carbonate it in the bottle. Any experience with this?

thanks again!
<<

CvilleKevin

Brewer

Posts: 72

Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 10:30 pm

Post Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:06 am

Re: cold crashing

If you bottle carbonate at 1.010 you have to be real careful to avoid bottle bombs. Personally, I just cold crash and force carbonate with a keg so thats not an issue. Of the methods I've read about for bottle carbonating a sweet cider, post-ferment pasteurizing looks like the most reliable
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/cider-v1-0-a-145045/

ultimately I think limiting nutrient levels may be a tastier way to go for bottle carbonation but more difficult
<<

rebuiltcellars

User avatar

Master Brewer

Posts: 3087

Joined: Wed May 28, 2008 8:00 am

Location: Finland

Post Thu Nov 05, 2009 3:21 am

Re: cold crashing

I have a friend who cold crashed his cider last year before it was dry, bottled it and then stored it cool at a temperature that was just barely within the yeast's active range. He monitored carbonation, then when it got to where he wanted it refridgerated the whole batch. He had good luck with this, but he does need to store it all refridgerated.

If you have a kegging set-up, I'll second the suggestion that you cold crash, allow it to settle for a long time, then keg and force carbonate. Much safer.
A clever/funny quote goes here.

Primary: Beer, wine or empty
Secondary: Beer, wine or empty
Bottled/Kegged: Beer, wine or empty

Return to Cider

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users