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Cereal mash or just boil the grits

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bo_gator

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Post Sun May 09, 2010 5:12 pm

Cereal mash or just boil the grits

I have always used flaked maize in my CAPs, but I am going to try stone ground corn grits and see if I can tell a difference. I am trying to decide if I should do a cereal mash with the grits, or just boil them for 15 minutes or so before adding to the mash. Any suggestions :?:
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babalu87

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Post Sun May 09, 2010 5:51 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

I think Denny and Majorvices throw them right in the mash.

I bring them to a boil with a gallon of strike water and let them sit for about 15 minutes and then add that to the mash after doughing in.

I brewed a Premium American Lager today and used grits instead of rice.
Wont brew another CAP until I get some 6-row
BIG difference between 2 and 6 row in a CAP
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Primary: Hefeweizen, Berliner Weisse, Imperial Stout ,Apfelwine
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Legman

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Post Sun May 09, 2010 6:32 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

babalu87 wrote:I think Denny and Majorvices throw them right in the mash.
I think that only works with quick grits.
I recently used regular grits (by mistake) in the mash and my efficiency dropped quite a bit.
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babalu87

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Post Sun May 09, 2010 6:39 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

Legman wrote:
babalu87 wrote:I think Denny and Majorvices throw them right in the mash.
I think that only works with quick grits.
I recently used regular grits (by mistake) in the mash and my efficiency dropped quite a bit.


Yes, Quick Grits for brewing
Grits for eating
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drf255

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 3:10 am

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

Bo, use Quick Grits. I've used then around 5 times now and they work great. Just dump them in the mash. They take up less space than grains and absorb less water, so use a little less water, then top off. Cheap as hell too. Around $3 for 5# by me. Much better than $2 per # at my LHBS for flaked maize. I still have a few # of maize sitting around, the grits have become so easy. They also have a nicer sweet flavor than maize.

I've done the regular cornmeal/grit thing. It is definitely alot stickier/gloppy (?word) if you dont cereal mash it. Check out Kai's site for pics of cereal mash vs. straight boiling.
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maltdog

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 8:59 am

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

IMO, cereal mash is the way to go... my experience is that just preboiling adjuncts is begging for a stuck mash. And yellow grits yield a far more intense sweet/grainy corn flavor than flaked maize.

I've never brewed with instant, so I can't comment on that.
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vanwolfhausen

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 1:11 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

babalu87 wrote:I think Denny and Majorvices throw them right in the mash.

I bring them to a boil with a gallon of strike water and let them sit for about 15 minutes and then add that to the mash after doughing in.

I brewed a Premium American Lager today and used grits instead of rice.
Wont brew another CAP until I get some 6-row
BIG difference between 2 and 6 row in a CAP


I really wanna try doing a pilsner with 6row. I always use 2row and never use 6row but, maybe grabbing 10-20lbs of it would be worth it.
Thanks,
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babalu87

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 1:21 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

vanwolfhausen wrote:
babalu87 wrote:I think Denny and Majorvices throw them right in the mash.

I bring them to a boil with a gallon of strike water and let them sit for about 15 minutes and then add that to the mash after doughing in.

I brewed a Premium American Lager today and used grits instead of rice.
Wont brew another CAP until I get some 6-row
BIG difference between 2 and 6 row in a CAP


I really wanna try doing a pilsner with 6row. I always use 2row and never use 6row but, maybe grabbing 10-20lbs of it would be worth it.


Trust me
It is
Jeff

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Primary: Hefeweizen, Berliner Weisse, Imperial Stout ,Apfelwine
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bo_gator

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 2:48 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

I have been pouring over my collection of beer/brewing books, and have not found a defining explanation of how/when/why to do a cereal mash. I assume next week or so when I brew my next CAP I will take an average of the mash steps leading up to boiling the grits and boil for the average of the times I have found published.



I am also convinced from what experienced local beer/brewers tell me, 6-row is the only way to go for CAPs or Cream Ales, and most other American Lagers. I recently received a 55lb sack of CMC 6-row Pilsner malt from North Country :mrgreen:



edit: When reading over mashing adjuncts in New Complete Joy of Home Brewing, Charlie P. mentions using corn starch, like the type used in baking for corn/maize in brewing since it can go straight into the mash-tun. Does anyone know what the ratio is between grits/flaked maize and corn starch :?:

I am making a wild guess that the corn starch is a purer form that grits or flaked maize is :mrgreen:
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TG

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 3:50 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

maltdog wrote:IMO, cereal mash is the way to go... my experience is that just preboiling adjuncts is begging for a stuck mash. And yellow grits yield a far more intense sweet/grainy corn flavor than flaked maize.

What's your ratio of malt to corn for the cereal mash? 10%?
TIA, Tom
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idbrew

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 4:09 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

bo_gator wrote:I have been pouring over my collection of beer/brewing books, and have not found a defining explanation of how/when/why to do a cereal mash.

IIRC the boiling gelatinizes the starches in raw rice/corn, making them more accessible for conversion. The enzymes from malt start breaking starches down and make the cereal mash less gooey (this makes pumping the cereal mash from a separate cereal cooker into the mash tun easier in large breweries).

I've only ever used raw grain (rice) once. I only boiled the rice (ground) and had a stuck mash :o
I think this might just have been an issue with my manifold slots being too wide, and dumping the sticky rice slurry in before the malt. The beer ultimately turned out fine, perfectly clear and good efficiency!

I bet you can safely skip adding malt and doing a saccharification rest, but I'm going to give it a shot next time I think.
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tom sawyer

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 5:03 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

Corn starch is going to be like using sugar. It won't contribute any flavor. I'd boil the grits and throw them in the mash once they're gelatinized.

I just tapped a keg of CAP I made with flaked maize, its pretty good stuff.
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sl8w

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 5:18 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

According to this thread, neither boiling nor cereal mash is necessary for (regular) polenta/corn grits: http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=79214. In reliance on that thread, I put some directly in the mash for my last Dark American Lager. I hit/exceeded my expected OG, with full conversion.
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maltdog

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 5:30 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

TG wrote:
maltdog wrote:IMO, cereal mash is the way to go... my experience is that just preboiling adjuncts is begging for a stuck mash. And yellow grits yield a far more intense sweet/grainy corn flavor than flaked maize.

What's your ratio of malt to corn for the cereal mash? 10%?
TIA, Tom
I've settled on around 10-12%. More is just too much corn flavor for me- that's using yellow grits from the "organic" store. But I wouldnt have an issue with up to 20% flaked, it's mellower.
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bo_gator

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Post Mon May 10, 2010 6:18 pm

Re: Cereal mash or just boil the grits

sl8w wrote:According to this thread, neither boiling nor cereal mash is necessary for (regular) polenta/corn grits: http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=79214. In reliance on that thread, I put some directly in the mash for my last Dark American Lager. I hit/exceeded my expected OG, with full conversion.

After reading that thread I wonder what amounts they are talking about using :?: The OP was asking about 1/2 pound in 5 gallons, but I am more in line with 5lbs of grits in a 12 gallon batch, so I wonder if that would affect it :?:
Critical thinking is our other national deficit

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