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Using polenta in the mash

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PaulK

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Post Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:28 am

Re: Using polenta in the mash

Denny wrote:Good info, Paul. I've always tried to find instant polenta when I use it. I won't bother in the future.



Well, we all know you like easy. :wink:
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babalu87

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Post Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:32 am

Re: Using polenta in the mash

PaulK wrote:
babalu87 wrote:Batch A and B had similar efficiencies?


Yes. So, considering that, I now opt for the simpler method of just adding the polenta directly to the mash. If the corn were very coarse like chicken grit I would likely go the pre-cooking method but for fine polenta, there's no reason not to just add it to the mash.


OK but with batch B you had some doughballs.
I'm wondering if you might have seen a slight difference if there were no doughballs because the pre-cooked may have converted more completely?
Jeff

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PaulK

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Post Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:42 am

Re: Using polenta in the mash

babalu87 wrote:
PaulK wrote:
babalu87 wrote:Batch A and B had similar efficiencies?


Yes. So, considering that, I now opt for the simpler method of just adding the polenta directly to the mash. If the corn were very coarse like chicken grit I would likely go the pre-cooking method but for fine polenta, there's no reason not to just add it to the mash.


OK but with batch B you had some doughballs.
I'm wondering if you might have seen a slight difference if there were no doughballs because the pre-cooked may have converted more completely?


The dough balls (corn balls) were minimal, basically a few dime sized balls. If it were more extensive I'm sure it would have a noticeable impact. I just mentioned that because it is something you need to be on the lookout for if you go the pre-cooked route.
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denverbrewhoo

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Post Tue Sep 22, 2009 12:12 pm

Re: Using polenta in the mash

as a transplanted (and sometimes, like today, a lil homesick) southerner, can we just say "grits" instead of "polenta"?

(I use quick grits --NEVER instant--and feel like I get the same result Paul K gets sprinkling directly into mash. Sometimes plain old Quaker, more often Whole Foods from the bulk bin)
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rebuiltcellars

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Post Wed Sep 23, 2009 1:19 pm

Re: Using polenta in the mash

denverbrewhoo wrote:as a transplanted (and sometimes, like today, a lil homesick) southerner, can we just say "grits" instead of "polenta"?


As a transplanted New Englander living in Northern Europe, I don't know what you are talking about. Aren't "grits" what they glue on sandpaper? :lol:
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denverbrewhoo

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Post Wed Sep 23, 2009 4:20 pm

Re: Using polenta in the mash

oh man, I'm sorry, didn't read your location in the original post. Yep, I guess in Finland it might be hard to find a box, or bag, of grits.....or anybody that knew what the hell they were...
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