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Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

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EQ2

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Post Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:23 am

Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

Just tasted Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo, and I have to agree with its perfect 100 pt. rating. This beer is extremely complex and balanced with it's 9% ABV! Does any one out there have or even heard of a clone receipe for this fantastic specimen???
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thejeep

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Post Fri Jan 21, 2011 6:06 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

You might have a bit of trouble unless you have a Yorkshire stone square, are willing to open ferment and have a a properly prepared oak cask at your disposal.
Airlocks are for wusses.
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BD

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Post Sat Jan 22, 2011 6:57 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

thejeep wrote:You might have a bit of trouble unless you have a Yorkshire stone square, are willing to open ferment and have a a properly prepared oak cask at your disposal.


EQ2 you should see this as a personal challenge to your honor and fell compelled to make a homebrew scale yorkshire stone square AND get an oak cask. Mainly because that would be awesome.

But seriously, I'm sure jeep is right in that you won't be able to duplicate it exactly but I think it's worth trying to come close.
The OG is 1.080
The abv is 8% (according to the merchant du vin PDF) some sources say 9%
The color is 30 SRM
THe IBUs are 30-35
You know what it tastes like (alas I do not). Now start experimenting! You're a homebrewer right? Don't let insurmountable odds stop you. I mean it.

So go to it and report back.
The lif so short, the craft so long to lerne,
Th'assay so sharp, so hard the conqueringe...
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thejeep

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Post Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:23 am

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

I have to say, I did read somewhere about someone using a large food grade rectangular tub as there "square". The idea was to allow for a larger surface area of wort to be exposed to the open air. Whether that actually effects the beer, remains to be seen.

I totally agree a scaled Yorkshire stone would be awesome, but, I don't think they are simply large squares made from slate. I think they have false bottoms, and some mechanical parts.
Airlocks are for wusses.
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EQ2

Apprentice Brewer

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Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 5:38 pm

Post Sun Jan 23, 2011 6:14 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

Thanks for the words of encouragement and info guys! With a little more research (and time), I'd hope to come out with something that is at least somewhat similiar to the Stingo. Quick question though, what would be a suitable enviroment (other than a consistant temperature controlled area) for open fermentation?
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BD

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Post Sun Jan 23, 2011 9:34 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

I'll let jeep handle that as the only open fermentation I've done so far was intentionally sour. But I'd think draft free would be one of the prerequisites.
The lif so short, the craft so long to lerne,
Th'assay so sharp, so hard the conqueringe...
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SA Brew

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Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:19 pm

Post Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:43 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

I have used 6 gallon lexan rectangles that I bought at a restaurant supply for years. They have lids that do not seal, and work great for English ales. I have stopped using them though because I do not have a draft free environment, and I had a few infections. Once I find a cheep fridge that seals, I will start using them again. I do not recommend real open fermentation unless you have an extremely clean environment. The wild yeasts in Texas taste brutal.

I would probably only put 4 gallons of barley wine in one of these rectangles though because they can over flow with yeast.
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thejeep

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 5:59 am

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

I knew I read it somewhere! SA Brew comes through!

I just use my fermenting bucket, in a draft free environment. I place a grease splatter guard, over the top of the bucket, for the first night (That keeps out any fruit flies or dust.) Then, once the head is formed I just let it do it's thing without the screen. I skim it twice a day after the first 48 hours and stir to rouse the yeast as well.
Airlocks are for wusses.
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patto1ro

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 7:54 am

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

A Yorkshire square isn't just an open square vessel.

You can find a description and a drawing here:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2008 ... -1914.html
Ron.
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thejeep

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:17 am

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

patto1ro wrote:A Yorkshire square isn't just an open square vessel.

You can find a description and a drawing here:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2008 ... -1914.html


Wow! That blog would make an exceptional series, of very informative, yet reasonably priced books on British and European brewing history and recipes.

It's got to be better than that Dornbusch drivel.
Airlocks are for wusses.
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BrewingRover

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 1:50 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

thejeep wrote:Wow! That blog would make an exceptional series, of very informative, yet reasonably priced books on British and European brewing history and recipes.

It's got to be better than that Dornbusch drivel.


He's self-published a few. I wouldn't call them reasonably priced, but that's self-publishing for you
http://stores.lulu.com/barclayperkins
I've got a plan so cunning you could put a tail on it and call it a weasel.
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thejeep

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 2:13 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

BrewingRover wrote:
thejeep wrote:Wow! That blog would make an exceptional series, of very informative, yet reasonably priced books on British and European brewing history and recipes.

It's got to be better than that Dornbusch drivel.


He's self-published a few. I wouldn't call them reasonably priced, but that's self-publishing for you
http://stores.lulu.com/barclayperkins



Apparently, my not so subtle, attempt at promoting Ron's work, was lost on you.
Airlocks are for wusses.
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SA Brew

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Post Mon Jan 24, 2011 11:30 pm

Re: Samuel Smith's Yorkshire Stingo clone?

I know my plastic squares are not the same as Yorkshire squares, but it is about as close as I can get on a home brewer's budget. I have made some tasty beer in those squares. My first attempt at this was a 10 gallon fish tank. I used it for a few years, and then I decided I was safer with food grade stuff. Thanks for the cool info. I can't wait until I have time to read it. I base a lot of my recipes on what I read about how a particular brewery makes their beer. I would love to come up with a practical Burton Union. I have seen a few posts, but I have not had the time to try any of them.

I should also add that those squares are really easy to clean. I hate carboys.

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