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Polishing Rice

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makebeernotwar

Post Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:50 pm

Polishing Rice

Does anyone know a good way to polish rice? Or at least the industrial way of doing this?

At the moment, I bypass this method by rinsing my rice excessively under water. When the water is clear I then soak the rice for overnight, before using it the next day. This may not be sufficient.

Any ideas would be great. Thanks
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Taylor-MadeAK

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Post Sat Oct 06, 2007 2:13 pm

Here's what I've done in the past:

Get a cardboard box of sufficient size to hold a good amount of rice, but still small enough to fit in your dryer (see where i'm going with this?). Tape down all of the flaps on the inside of the box, add your rice, and seal all openings on the outside. Put this in your dryer with pillows on all sides to hold the box in the middle, then run it for an hour or two on no/low heat.
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0re0z

Post Fri Nov 09, 2007 4:38 am

Sounds like a logical idea there buddy.i may try that with some ordinary long grain rice, just to test out the theory

has anyone really tried it yet?

And if you have, how did it work out?
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Jewell Sake

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Post Tue May 27, 2008 8:14 pm

I wanted to revive this thread because I'm about to buy my second lot of polished rice from FH Steinbart. The price and shipping are killing me! :x Has anyone had any success in this area?
I tried a rock tumbler, but that didn't work. My experiences with that don't give me confidence in the dryer method. Bob, please let me know how well that's worked for you.
Are there any other techniques or sources for polished rice out there?
A side note--I just visited the Takara brewery in Berkeley and and was surprised to hear they don't polish their own rice. They told me that's done by their rice supplier-- that doesn't bode well for the sake homebrewer.
This aggression will not stand, man!
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Taylor-MadeAK

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Post Tue May 27, 2008 9:25 pm

Jewell Sake wrote:Bob, please let me know how well that's worked for you.

It doesn't. :( Rice grains just don't seem to have enough weight to grind each other down like that. I guess you could go old-skool and polish your rice the way the Japanese did it before the invention of rice polishing machinery. They dug a nice deep pit, lined it with cloth (burlap, I think), filled it with rice, then used a big heavy log that fit just inside the pit to pound the #### out of that rice for hours and hours and hours....

That would probably break your rice up more than anything, though. The way I understand it is that rice milling requires rice that is about 14% moisture. Any more than that and the rice crumbles, any less and the rice breaks because of brittleness. What I don't know is how the milling is actually accomplished. The best source I've found so far just says "mild friction inside the machine."

Most sake kura do indeed have their rice polished by their supplier. Saves them on equipment, equipment maintenance, and energy costs.
Primary: Nothing. Gainfully employed now, but still broke.
Secondary:
Bottled: Saké 2010
Make some sake.
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keat

Post Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:47 am

Taylor-MadeAK wrote:
Jewell Sake wrote:Bob, please let me know how well that's worked for you.

It doesn't. :( Rice grains just don't seem to have enough weight to grind each other down like that. I guess you could go old-skool and polish your rice the way the Japanese did it before the invention of rice polishing machinery. They dug a nice deep pit, lined it with cloth (burlap, I think), filled it with rice, then used a big heavy log that fit just inside the pit to pound the #### out of that rice for hours and hours and hours....

That would probably break your rice up more than anything, though. The way I understand it is that rice milling requires rice that is about 14% moisture. Any more than that and the rice crumbles, any less and the rice breaks because of brittleness. What I don't know is how the milling is actually accomplished. The best source I've found so far just says "mild friction inside the machine."

Most sake kura do indeed have their rice polished by their supplier. Saves them on equipment, equipment maintenance, and energy costs.


I've bought "boutique" rice in Japan that is polished according to your preference, and done on the spot. They have a machine very similar to a dryer, where they pour the unpolished rice in, program the degree of polishing, and within minutes, the polished rice comes out. Quite fascinating, wish I had taken a photo of the machine. The difference between that machine and a dryer is the speed - much faster. A little google search brings this link, which mentions a "household-use polishing machine", sounds like they have a household-scale machine as well.

And the rice was one of the best I've ever tasted.

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