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Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

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Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Yes
37
39%
No
47
49%
I make a starter
3
3%
No Pants
8
8%
 
Total votes : 95
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HalenRush

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:09 pm

Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I stopped using dry yeast about 8 years ago, and was thinking about trying it out again to keep brewing costs down. Back then, I rehydrated it because Charlie Papazian told me to. I've seen on this board from time to time that some people don't bother, and just dump it in.
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majorvices

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:15 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Normally I do and I think I have shorter lags and shorter fermentations when I do. For low gravity beers under 1.050 I don't.
- Keith Y.
-------------------------
Ein Prosit, der gemutlichkeit!
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Denny

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:28 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I never do. My lag times vary, but it doesn't cause any problems so I don't worry about it.
Life begins at 60....1.060, that is.

www.dennybrew.com
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jdata

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:29 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I don't rehydrate, but I always feel guilty about it.

Since switching to carboys from buckets, I've been thinking about it just for the fact of being able to get the yeast more distributed right away.
Bottled: American Pilsner, Altbier, Barleywine 2008
Fermenting: Northern Amber, Orange Blossom Mead, Barleywine 2009
On Deck: Prob'ly something wheaty
<<

FatTony

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:31 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Rehydrating in warm (90-100deg) water improves viability. A dry pack (11g) pitched into cold wort gives about as much viable yeast as a vial or smack pack. The same pack of properly rehydrated yeast gives as much viable yeast as 2L starter. That's free yeast in my book.
Primary: Irish Red
Secondary: 2010 Barleywine
Kegged: Citra IPA, Big Red
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jeff wright

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:54 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I actually pitch my yeast as the brew kettle is draining into the fermenter. Lag times are usually <24 hours.

Brew on, :cheers:
jeff
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TG

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:00 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

This is the explanation from Dr. Clayton Cone of Lallemand:

"Let me give you some facts regarding rehydration and you can decide for
yourself where you want to compromise.
Every strain of yeast has its own optimum rehydration temperature. All of
them range between 95 F to 105F. Most of them closer to 105F. The dried
yeast cell wall is fragile and it is the first few minutes (possibly
seconds) of rehydration that the warm temperature is critical while it is
reconstituting its cell wall structure.

As you drop the initial temperature of the water from 95 to 85 or 75 or 65F
the yeast leached out more and more of its insides damaging the each cell.
The yeast viability also drops proportionally. At 95 - 105 F, there is
100% recovery of the viable dry yeast. At 60F, there can be as much as 60%
dead cells.

The water should be tap water with the normal amount of hardness present.
The hardness is essential for good recovery. 250 -500 ppm hardness is
ideal. This means that deionized or distilled water should not be used.
Ideally, the warm rehydration water should contain about 0.5 - 1.0% yeast
extract

For the initial few minutes (perhaps seconds) of rehydration, the yeast
cell wall cannot differentiate what passes through the wall. Toxic
materials like sprays, hops, SO2 and sugars in high levels, that the yeast
normally can selectively keep from passing through its cell wall rush right
in and seriously damage the cells. The moment that the cell wall is
properly reconstituted, the yeast can then regulate what goes in and out of
the cell. That is why we hesitate to recommend rehydration in wort or
must. Very dilute wort seems to be OK.

We recommend that the rehydrated yeast be added to the wort within 30
minutes. We have built into each cell a large amount of glycogen and
trehalose that give the yeast a burst of energy to kick off the growth
cycle when it is in the wort. It is quickly used up if the yeast is
rehydrated for more than 30 minutes. There is no damage done here if it is
not immediatly add to the wort. You just do not get the added benefit of
that sudden burst of energy. We also recommend that you attemperate the
rehydrated yeast to with in 15F of the wort before adding to the wort.
Warm yeast into a cold wort will cause many of the yeast to produce petite
mutants that will never grow or ferment properly and will cause them to
produce H2S. The attemperation can take place over a very brief period by
adding, in encrements, a small amount of the cooler wort to the rehydrated
yeast.

Many times we find that warm water is added to a very cold container that
drops the rehydrating water below the desired temperature.

Sometimes refrigerated, very cold, dry yeast is added directly to the warm
water with out giving it time to come to room temperature. The initial
water intering the cell is then cool.

How do many beer and wine makers have successful fermentations when they
ignore all the above? I believe that it is just a numbers game. Each gram
of Active Dry Yeast contains about 20 billion live yeast cells. If you
slightly damage the cells, they have a remarkable ability to recover in the
rich wort. If you kill 60% of the cell you still have 8 billion cells per
gram that can go on to do the job at a slower rate.

The manufacturer of Active Dry Beer Yeast would be remiss if they offered
rehydration instructions that were less than the very best that their data
indicated.

One very important factor that the distributor and beer maker should keep
in mind is that Active Dry Yeast is dormant or inactive and not inert, so
keep refrigerated at all times. Do not store in a tin roofed warehouse
that becomes an oven or on a window sill that gets equally hot.

Active Dry Yeast looses about 20% of its activity in a year when it is
stored at 75 F and only 4% when refrigerated.

The above overview of rehydration should tell you that there is a very best
way to rehydrate. It should also tell you where you are safe in adapting
the rehydration procedure to fit your clients.

Clayton Cone."
<<

strangebrewer

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:30 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I've always rehydrated dry yeast and have had activity within 12-18 hours. I don't know if that is the same if you just pitch it straight in but I have just never messed with what works :cheers:
<<

redbeerman

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:34 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I rehydrate most of the time, but to be honest I haven't seen much of a difference when I don't.
"Every man has to believe in something, I believe I'll have another beer."
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steinbrau

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:39 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

+1
Sometimes I do and sometimes I don't. Never noticed much difference. :P
"He who dies with the most toys IS STILL DEAD!"
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tgoodz

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:40 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

I try to rehydrate. On occasion I have done 1 packet dry/1 rehydrated for no real reason. :blah:
Tankdeer wrote:...I brewed an IPA for a party we were having on 6/6/06. My friend, (who was a virgin) and I contemplated for a moment putting some of his blood in the beer. We decided that while it would be funny, it probably was not the best idea. So we didn't.
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igrowhops

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:10 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

In my own comparisons, fermentation starts quicker when rehydrated. I always try to rehydrate.
Fermenting-Gewurztraminer Raspberry mead, irish red
Tap-milk stout, pale ale
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Denny

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:29 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Those of you who say thet fermentation starts more quickly when you rehydrate...how are you gauging that? Do you split a batch and pitch 2 packs of the same yeast, with the same date and lot code, one rehydrated and one not? If you compaqre 2 successive brews, do you make sure the yeast has the same date and lot code? See what I'm getting at here?
Life begins at 60....1.060, that is.

www.dennybrew.com
<<

wzl46

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:36 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Denny wrote:See what I'm getting at here?


You are getting at scientifical proof and stuff.
We should look for somebody to eat and drink with before we look for something to eat and drink. --Epecurus
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majorvices

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Post Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:38 pm

Re: Do you rehydrate dry yeast?

Denny wrote:Those of you who say thet fermentation starts more quickly when you rehydrate...how are you gauging that? Do you split a batch and pitch 2 packs of the same yeast, with the same date and lot code, one rehydrated and one not? If you compaqre 2 successive brews, do you make sure the yeast has the same date and lot code? See what I'm getting at here?


Yes. I did spilt a batch once. And the rehydrated one took off faster. I also split a batch once and aerated one and didn't aerate the other and the non aerated one took almost 3 days to take off. Kind of blow that theory that dry yeast doesn;t need aeration.
- Keith Y.
-------------------------
Ein Prosit, der gemutlichkeit!
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