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Moving a hop rhizome

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larsenj

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 1:41 pm

Moving a hop rhizome

Hello everybody...

Two years ago, I purchased four hop plants (from Dave) and planted them. I didn't really take care of them (due to a lack of time) but they all grew; however, nothing came of it: they didn't grow that well and never produced any hop cones. So, this year I'd like to move them to a better spot (and take better care of them, of course!) :wink:

Two questions:
1) how does one dig up a hop rhizome (without killing it)?
and
2) if I find that one of my rhizomes is decent-sized, is it OK to cut it in half and plant them both separately?

Thanks!
Jeff
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igrowhops

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 1:46 pm

I have never moved my hops, but am planning on doing so one of these weekends. We are taking down our deck, and putting in a patio. Our hops currentyly grow up the side of the deck. So My plan is to dig them up before new growth starts. Hopefully keeping some of the roots intact. I dont see why you cannot cut your rhizome, but make sure that each piece has shoots growing on it, or you might cut it for no reason. That is how new rhizomes come to be anyway.
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ryan6458

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 1:49 pm

Dig a circle around your plant. At least two feet. Try and move the whole thing in one piece. I had to move a Centennial plant after a year of being established and I was pretty amazed by the root growth. Once I got it dug up I put it in a bucket to move. They're actually pretty hard to kill, especially one that has had a chance to get established. If you had good growth, you should be able to split off a couple of rhizomes.
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UncleTom

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 3:31 pm

They are easy to move and very forgiving of being cut up. I have moved mine twice in four years and still got a good crop last fall even though they were transplanted last spring. The roots were huge so I just cut them back to fit in a large flower pot for transport, keeping as much soil around them as possible.
I have seen advice to cut them back every year just to keep them from spreading too far. They said to take a shovel and cut a circle of approx two feet around each plant. I haven't tried that but my transplant experience shows that it should not hurt them.
So, transplant as soon as possible and you should get a good crop the following year. I know K Goldings and Fuggles grow great in Turtle Lake.
Uncle
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mattmelcher

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 4:50 pm

Just dig 'em up and move 'em. Hops are hard to kill. For most of us, we started our hops gardens with something the size of our finger. Divide them up however you want. As long as you've got something with a few eyes and some roots, it will grow.

I just moved 3 of mine and the whole process took maybe 10 minutes.
Makes it's own sauce when you add water...
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pinnah

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Post Tue Apr 01, 2008 4:59 pm

Yep. And don't be surprised if you still have hops in the old location!
You are bound to leave a few bits behind... :lol:
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larsenj

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Post Wed Apr 02, 2008 7:17 am

Thanks for the advice, everyone...

...now I just have to wait for the ground to thaw! :roll:
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