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What's the deal with Hallertau???

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vsiddhartha

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 11:36 am

What's the deal with Hallertau???

Can someone please explain the difference between:

- Hallertau
- Hallertauer
- Hallertau Hallertauer
- Hallertauer mittelfrueh
- Halltertau Hersbrucker

Are any of them the same hops? Which ones? Also, while we're at it, what about:

- Tettnang
- Tettnanger
- Tettnanger tettnang

Been brewing for 18 months, and I still don't know this!
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yurko

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 12:23 pm

Re: What's the deal with Hallertau???

they are different strains of an original variety. sometimes bred to be more disease resistant or have another desirable quality. Sometimes the different name reflects different qualities that manifest in a strain when it is grown somewhere other than it's native region. I think Ray Daniels talks about some of those differences in his book.
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Herr Bleicher

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 12:24 pm

I'll take a stab:

Hallertau is a variety of hop; Hallertau is also the name of a region in Bavaria where hops are grown ... Hersbrucker is also both a hop and a growing region.

So a Hallertau Hallertauer refers to a Hallertau hop grown in the Hallertau region. Hallertau Hersbrucker is a Hersbrucker hop grown in Hallertau. Hersbruck Hersbrucker would be a Hersbrucker hop grown in Hersbruck, Hallertau Tradition is a Tradition hop grown in Hallertau, Hallertau Northern Brewer, Hallertau Magnum, etc.

A Hallertau hop grown in two different regions would share some characteristics but probably be subtly different - like a Cabernet wine made from California grapes vs one from French grapes.

I believe Mittelfruh refers to a variety or sub-variety of Hallertau Hallertauer that is ready for early harvest ("middle-early").

I believe the same nomenclature applies to Tettnang and Spalt.
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vsiddhartha

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 12:36 pm

Re: What's the deal with Hallertau???

yurko wrote:they are different strains of an original variety. sometimes bred to be more disease resistant or have another desirable quality. Sometimes the different name reflects different qualities that manifest in a strain when it is grown somewhere other than it's native region. I think Ray Daniels talks about some of those differences in his book.

:? Got any specifics? Which is which? What qualities do they have? :D
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vaulton

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 2:19 pm

hallertau hersbruck origin germany,usage bittering (wheat beers),flavor,aroma. alpha acid 2.3-5%AA ,substitute hallertau mittelfruh.

hallertau origin US usage flavor,aroma AA3.5-4-5% substitute german hallertau hersbruck.

hallertau mittelfruh origin germany usage bittering,flavor,aroma 3.5-5.5AA substitute german hallertau hersbruck.

hallertau tradition origin germany usage aroma 4-5.7%AA substitute hallertau mittelfruh.
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Denny

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:17 pm

And just to totally screw things up, US Tettnangs are Fuggles....yes, REALLY!
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SeanL

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:24 pm

Denny wrote:And just to totally screw things up, US Tettnangs are Fuggles....yes, REALLY!


Did you find that out the hard way, Denny, being as you hate Fuggles? :lol:
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davidw

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:28 pm

From: "Using Hops" by Mark Garetz, (with his expressed permission), pages 26-27, section title 'Decoding European Hop Names'.

Quote:

As was mentioned earlier, European (mainly German) hops usually have the growing region as part of the hop's name. The primary reason for this is that most of the important European varieties only produce the desired brewing qualities when grown in a specific region. Through many years of natural selection, varieties that are indigenous to the growing area have emerged, mainly because only one varity was grown there, so there was no need to be more specific. Some of these varieties are still grown in their place of origin and some are not.

European hops may have the same variety name as the place where they originated. But because these hops may no longer be grown in the place after which they are named, the place where they are now being grown is attached to the hop name as an adjective. Here's an example: A common hop from Germany is the variety called Hersbrucker. It originated in the Hersbruck region. It is called a Hersbrucker because it came from Hersbruck. Think about it this way: If you came from New York, we could call you a New Yorker. The "er" is always part of the *variety* name. If this hop was grown in the Hersbruck region, this hop would be called a Hersbruck Hersbrucker. But most of the Hersbrucker grown today is actually grown in the Hallertau region. Hersbrucker grown in the Hallertau region would be called Hallertau Hersbrucker.

This gets confusing because there is also a Hallertauer variety. When it is grown in the Hallertau, it is called Hallertau Hallertauer. Now I'm going to throw one more curve at you: The most prized hop in the world is the noble hop Hallertauer Mittelfruh. "Now wait a minute!" I hear you say, "I thought I was just getting this straight, and here's a hop name with an "er" on the *first* word." Well right you are, it doesn't appear to be 'correct'. Well that's because the real name for this hop is Hallertau Hallertauer Mittelfruh. Mittelfruh means "middle-early" in the growing season. Hallertauers that matured at different times just weren't the same. So "Hallertauer Mittelfruh" is a sub-variety of Hallertauer. To shorten the name up, most people leave off the first Hallertau since all Hallertauer Mittelfruh was assumed to be grown in the Hallertau.

Let's recap how German hop names are put together: The *first* word is the place where this actual hop is grown. It does *not* have an "er" on it. The *second* word is the variety name. If the variety was named after a place, it has "er" tacked on the end. Sometimes there is a third word that can describe a sub-variety, in which case the first word (where its now grown) is sometimes dropped. Examples are Hallertauer Mittelfruh and Hallertauer Tradition.

Now if someone is selling something they simply call "Hallertau" your first question should be "Hallertau what?" Usually this will be Hallertauer grown here in the US. Don't assume that just because the word Hallertau is used that the hop was grown in Germany. And if it is from Germany, you now know that "Hallertau" only tells you *where* the hop was grown, not which *variety* (lots of different varieties are grown in the Hallertau). We'll get more into depth on this subject in the chapter on buying hops.

End quote.

That is the basis for my understanding of how to 'decode' a (German) hop name.

Many thanks to Mark for allowing me to blatantly copy from his excellent book.

david
Boom, like that.
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vsiddhartha

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Post Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:37 pm

Thanks David! That's exactly what I was looking for! It explains everything. So I have some hops I bought at the LHBS (can't remember if they're packaged by ID Carlson or Crosby and Baker), and they say "Hallertau, imported from Germany". They could be anything grown in the Hallertau region, right? Or maybe they're just lazily labeled, and are Hallertau Hallertauer? Damn that's annoying!

What about the "Tettnang" hops NB sells? Are they US Tettnangs (and Fuggles like Denny said), or are they some random hop grown in the Tettnang region of Germany?

Thanks again for the great explanation. Definitely going to bookmark it.
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davidw

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Post Wed Jun 13, 2007 7:35 am

Yep, some suppliers can be a little slack when it comes to labeling the hops they are offering. The only real way to be sure is to ask (them) prior to ordering.
Boom, like that.
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Atlas366

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Post Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:29 pm

Ugh...German wine labels are the same way.
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webmar

Post Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:40 pm

here is a good website that will describe many different types of hops.

Be sure to take a look at the pictures of the hop farm. very impressive.
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denverbrewhoo

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Post Wed Jun 13, 2007 3:09 pm

Denny wrote:And just to totally screw things up, US Tettnangs are Fuggles....yes, REALLY!


So are Styrian Goldings. Evidently a shipper mislabeled something way back when.

(I believe Willamette are a Fuggles cultivar as well. Them Fuggles is fugglin' EVERYWHERE)
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