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what does og mean?

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chris_newton

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:04 am

what does og mean?

Hi all

I have bought my 2nd lager kit and on it it say OG 1036 - 1040

What does this mean??

Thanks all

Chris
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silverfront

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Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:11 am

ORIGINAL GRAVITY.... and if you don't know what that is, i would put off brewing for a little while to do some homework. :wink:

www.howtobrew.com
Last edited by silverfront on Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dgwatson

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:11 am

OG = Original Gravity. This is a measure of density, and sugars are more dense than water. (Water = 1.000). As the sugars get converted to ethanol (SG=0.8) and CO2, the specific gravity will drop.

This FAQ may be useful to you: all the abbreviations (or at least most of them) that are commonly used here.[/url]
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pk

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:11 am

Using a hydrometer, measure the gravity of the wort before adding the yeast. This would be the OG.
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pk

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:12 am

silverfront wrote:ORIGINAL GRAVITY.... and if you don't know what that is, i would put off brewing for a little while to do some homework. :wink:


Yikes, that sure is some tough love...
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chris_newton

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:13 am

so will this benefit me at all knowing this figure??
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silverfront

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Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:25 am

ok perhaps i've been a little harsh, it's not really my intention but i apologize, . tough love? yeah but not as tough as spending all kinds of time and money to fail when a modicum of preperation (i.e. homework) is all that's needed. my philosophy is to understand what you're trying to do before you do it. i read two books on brewing before my first batch hit the kettle. i knew what i was getting myself into and i've succeeded thus far.

the fastest way to get spoiled on something is to fail repeatedly. the easiest way to avoid failure is to know what you're doing.

so, chris, my suggestion is that you should probably read www.howtobrew.com
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Gmku

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:28 am

silverfront wrote:ok perhaps i've been a little harsh, it's not really my intention but i apologize, . tough love? yeah but not as tough as spending all kinds of time and money to fail when a modicum of preperation (i.e. homework) is all that's needed. my philosophy is to understand what you're trying to do before you do it. i read two books on brewing before my first batch hit the kettle. i knew what i was getting myself into and i've succeeded thus far.

the fastest way to get spoiled on something is to fail repeatedly. the easiest way to avoid failure is to know what you're doing.

so, chris, my suggestion is that you should probably read www.howtobrew.com


well, I think you make a point that needs to made, though. I read a lot of things from new brewers and have to wonder really what kind of research they did before jumping into the hobby. Sometimes it sounds like they've done no reading beforehand at all.
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pk

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:28 am

silverfront wrote:ok perhaps i've been a little harsh, it's not really my intention but i apologize, . tough love? yeah but not as tough as spending all kinds of time and money to fail when a modicum of preperation (i.e. homework) is all that's needed. my philosophy is to understand what you're trying to do before you do it. i read two books on brewing before my first batch hit the kettle. i knew what i was getting myself into and i've succeeded thus far.

the fastest way to get spoiled on something is to fail repeatedly. the easiest way to avoid failure is to know what you're doing.

so, chris, my suggestion is that you should probably read www.howtobrew.com


Agreed :D
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kdroberts

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Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:37 am

I would try to avoid the kit cans of larger as almost all of them are not actually larger. If you want to brew real larger then you will need some way of keeping the fermentation much colder than room temperature. Whenever I drank that type of kit larger it always tatsed more like a very low hopped pale ale.
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Denny

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Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 10:45 am

kdroberts wrote:I would try to avoid the kit cans of larger as almost all of them are not actually larger. If you want to brew real larger then you will need some way of keeping the fermentation much colder than room temperature. Whenever I drank that type of kit larger it always tatsed more like a very low hopped pale ale.


LAGER...it's LAGER, not LARGER!!! :lol:
Life begins at 60....1.060, that is.

www.dennybrew.com
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kdroberts

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Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 11:03 am

Denny wrote:
kdroberts wrote:I would try to avoid the kit cans of larger as almost all of them are not actually larger. If you want to brew real larger then you will need some way of keeping the fermentation much colder than room temperature. Whenever I drank that type of kit larger it always tatsed more like a very low hopped pale ale.


LAGER...it's LAGER, not LARGER!!! :lol:


Must be my west country accent coming through in text form!
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Scooter36

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 11:27 am

What no one mentioned specifically is that OG can give you a fair estimate of the amount of Alcohol the beer will result in. Something that's important to every brewer!

And no, you don't need to be able to do or know anything other than follow directions to make a beer. Hope it turns our good! It's a fun hobby and very rewarding. Once you finish this batch, let us know how it turns out.

And if you ever want to know how to make better beer this is just the place to come to -- most kits like the one you're using result in beers that mostly taste the same.
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stumptowner

Post Mon Jul 25, 2005 9:20 pm

It's not important for you to know Original Gravity when you are making a kit beer or following an extract recipe.
it can tell you a bit about your beer, and the expected potential amount of alcohol if your yeasts do a terrific job.

But really, you don't need to know this for your first brew. Just follow the direcitons on the kit, and you'll make some beer. And it will probably be pretty good, and it might even be great.

As you get more comfortable with the process, you'll probably want to play around with a hydrometer and follow the gravity readings as your beer ferments. You'll learn a lot about beer making, as you actually make it.
There are lots of places to read about making beer .. You've probably already heard of Palmers' How To Brew website and book. Some of the websites can seem kind of intimidating because they can get too technical when you're just getting started. Later on, you'll probably really enjoy the technical aspects.

I'll bet you have a lot of fun when you make your brew, and I'll bet you do just fine! Even if you never test the OG!
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chris_newton

Post Tue Jul 26, 2005 1:19 am

thanks for all your help

i will post my results from batch!
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