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Decoction method

looking over different methods… I’m coming to a conclusion that you pull out 1/3 and you get to say… a protein rest… for 20 minutes… then jack it up to a boil… after which you slowly incorporate that to your full mash tun… repeat 2 more times. for Beta then mashout…
Any help deciffering this method would be appreciated… I’ll be starting some lager series and I think this will be a method to try.
Sneezles61

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I don’t decoct the protein rest. I just do a hot water infusion and get the temperature from the P restto 145f. Rest their for about 20 min. Then pull about a gallon thick grainy mash and get to a boil for 5 minutes. Dump that in and get the mash to 158f. That should be about 35 minutes into the mash. Let it rest their until about 50 minutes in. Then pull another decoction boil and add back a 60 minutes for mash out.

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One article sez alot of breweries over in Europe do a single decoction… usually a mash out… I think, thats were I’ll start…
Bring some of the mash dough and some wort (?) up to 170*F for 5-10 minutes… then bring to a boil and add back to the mash-tun? I’ll need to build up my yeast any-who for a bigger bock…
Ooh… re-reading yours BC, you don’t do the temp correction with the decoction… you GET to the desired temp, then pull for the boil/caramelization period…
Sneezles61

If you only want to do a single decoction i would still use my method only skip the mash out decoction. This way you get your traditional temperature steps

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K
Sneezles61

Read a very informative article from 2014 home brewers association… The detested decoction method… I think it was by Mashing in Michigan… should you be able to find it… you know there is no way I can post it…
Sneezles61

What is the gist of the article? 2014 is ancient history. Back then i was still struggling with fly sparge. BIAB was frowned upon.

articles regarding the decoction that I’ve read seem to tell you to scoop out 1/3 of the grains/wort and boil…
and thats it… Its quite different…
Our craft is quite old too… but the way things were done years ago seem relevant today… :sunglasses:
Sneezles61

Well lf you you mash with 3 or four gallons and scoop out a gallon that’s about a third so what’s different

What re-action is going on before you pull out the grist… thats whats not explained in most articles…
Do you add water stir in the grist… allow it to soak in then pull out the 1/3 to boil? Or is there more than meets the eye?
Like the cold/protein rest… There is activity… Do we allow the activity to happen or just boil?..(acid rest)… then pull out the 1/3 denature that amount… dump it back in and allow the next phase to occur?
Even get to doing a decoction Amylase rest… then boil and add back to a cold mash-tun to get up to Beta rest?
There is so much happening…
And we’ve read that this occurred because thermometers weren’t around for a majority of brewing life… Perhaps in another 200+ years, then the thermometer will be utilized as long as decoction was… Just paradigm’s… Fascinating from my point of perspective…
Sneezles61

No your not following your doing your first rest for 20 minuets so your get conversion then pull , what’s left is still is converting as well as the decoction as it heats up. You dump back in to raise your temp to the next step and that goes to your 60 or longer if your worried.

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Its simply a diffusion step mash using decocted wort instead of plain water

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Right… But those are some points that seem to get glossed over in many articles…
Having this exchange here, fills in blank areas… well, at least for me…
I wonder how the Germans determined if they stirred in the decocted amount long enough, or not? They didn’t know about enzymatic re-actions… but then… they were the ones to refine our mashing schedules we use today… right?
I wonder why some of the continental breweries over there still preform at least a single decoction… It can’t be just because its fun? I really wonder how much the caramelization/malliard effect changes to out come… This is why I need to try this… I feel there is some added benefit… but now most brewers are “OK” with doing less… :neutral_face:
Sneezles61

Well it goes back to the difference between home brewing and commercial brewing. When you’re working with small batches you can adjust temperature quickly. Not to mention the use of modern malts.

Heck wasn’t long ago people pooh poohed BIAB. Now those same people buy the grainfather and dont realize they are doing BIAB🤣

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When I do my first decoction, I’ll just do a one step on my first try… dip my toe in the wort? :joy:… I’ll build up my yeast… I’ll be looking forward to a bock… perhaps another small lager… then the finale… Miabock…
I don’t have a controlled fermenter at the moment… but I’ll bet I can keep garage at a comfortable temp…
Isn’t a dehumidifier a cooling kinda gizmo? I’ve got an extra… hhhmmm… Need to ask the web about this…
Sneezles61

Well my bock is tucked in
I tried to make a YouTube of the decoction process I’ll try and get it on here

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The grey dis-connect is a spunding valve? And yes, I’d like to see the basic of the decoction process…
I’m hoping in the next few days to gear towards starting my lager series… Reducing the RA… employing a decoction… I’ll be busy… and its a good busy-ness too!
Sneezles61

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Yes that is the spunding valve. When transferring the beer i take it off and hook CO2 pressure and move the spunding valve to the keg and push it while maintaining pressure in the fermzilla. Works nice completely sealed transfer

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